Some argued that the intense security during the trial last fall in Portland was overblown. One called the physical restraint of Mumford an “appalling overreaction.” Several wrote of a perceived animosity between Mumford and the marshals throughout the case.

Maxine Bernstein

OregonLive

Several defense attorneys from the first Oregon refuge occupation trial have written memos supporting Ammon Bundy’s lawyer in his fight with the federal court over his behavior during and at the end of the trial when he was tackled by federal marshals and stunned with a Taser.

The attorneys praised Marcus Mumford for his demeanor, said he didn’t have enough time to prepare for the trial but was a zealous advocate for his client. Some wrote that U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown was especially tough on Mumford, and there was longstanding animosity between Mumford and the marshals before the physical confrontation.

Mumford faced criminal charges after deputy marshals tackled him in the courtroom and took him into custody following the announcement of not guilty verdicts on Oct. 27, 2016, but prosecutors later dropped them. Mumford had shouted at the judge, argued for Ammon Bundy’s release and demanded to see a detention order from Nevada.

Now Mumford is challenging an effort by the chief U.S. District judge for Oregon, Michael W. Mosman, to bar him from practicing law in Oregon’s federal courts. Mumford is from Utah.

This week, Mumford filed in court sworn declarations from his fellow defense attorneys. Some argued that the intense security during the trial last fall in Portland was overblown. One called the physical restraint of Mumford an “appalling overreaction.” Several wrote of a perceived animosity between Mumford and the marshals throughout the case.

They described a lunch break in the middle of the trial when one deputy marshal told the defense lawyers and their clients that their time was up for conferring together.

Mumford said something like, “Just five more minutes, guys.” Another deputy marshal apparently charged toward Mumford and “dressed him down for ‘disrespecting’ another deputy,” according to the defense lawyers’ statements.

Amanda B. Mendenhall, an associate in Mumford’s law firm who helped him during most of the trial, said she stood between the deputy marshal and Mumford that afternoon. She wrote that she believed “the marshals had been gunning for Marcus for some time.”

Read the full article here


Free Range Report

Comments

  1. Appears the federal court in Oregon’s marshalls are guilty of thuggery and intimidation. I wonder if they have to take a special class to achieve that status or if it just comes by naturally.

Leave a Reply to Kippy Poulson Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *